Laura A. Beebe, Ph.D.

 

beebe[1]

 

 

 

 

Professor of Epidemiology

Phone: (405) 271-2229 x48061
Office:

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
801 NE 13th St, Room 317
Oklahoma City, OK 73104
Tel: (405) 271-2229 x48061

Email: Laura-Beebe@ouhsc.edu

Education and Training

  • PhD, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • MPH, University Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
  • BS, Phillips University, Enid, OK

APPOINTMENTS AND POSITIONS:

  • Deputy Director for Tobacco Research, Stephenson Cancer Center, February 2014-2015

  • Co-Director, Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, July 2013 – present

  • Professor of Epidemiology, July 2010 – present

  • Founding Director, Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center, Stephenson Cancer Center, July 2008 – June 2013

  • Associate Professor of Epidemiology, 2005-2010

  • Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, 1998-2006

 

Recent Publications (* indicates student author):

  • *Mowls DS, McCaffree DR, Beebe LA. Trends in Lung Cancer Incidence Rates, Oklahoma 2005-2010. PloS One. (accepted for publication)

  • Beebe LA, Bush T. Post-cessation weight concerns among women calling a state tobacco quitline. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S61-4.

  • Laux FL, Chaloupka FJ, Beebe LA. Excise tax differences at Oklahoma smoke shops: an opportunity for inter-tribal coordination. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S111-19.

  • Leuthard JL, Beebe LA, Halstead L, Olson KD, Smith JW. Increased evidence-based tobacco treatment through Oklahoma hospital systems change. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S65-70.

  • *Martinez SA, Beebe LA, Campbell JE. Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline utilization and cessation among American Indians. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S47-53.

  • Rhoades RR, Beebe LA, Boeckman L, Williams MB. Communities of Excellence in Tobacco Control: changes in local policy and key outcomes. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S21-8.

  • Rhoades RR, Beebe LA. Tobacco control and prevention in Oklahoma: best practices in a preemptive state. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S6-12.

  • Mushtaq N, Boeckman LM, Beebe LA. Predictors of smokeless tobacco cessation among telephone quitline participants.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S54-60.

  • *James S, Rhoades RR, Mushtaq N, Paulson S, Beebe LA. Longitudinal evaluation of the Tobacco Stops with Me campaign. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015 Jan;48(1 Suppl 1):S71-7.

  • Mushtaq N, Beebe LA, Vesely SK, Neas B.  A multiple motive approach to measure dependence among smokeless tobacco users. Addictive Behaviors 2014 Mar; 39(3):622-9.

  • Mushtaq N, *Williams M, Beebe LA.  Concurrent use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco among US males and females. Journal of Environmental and Public Health; vol. 2012, Article ID 984561, 11 pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/984561.

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

  • Epidemiology of tobacco use
  • Program evaluation research
  • Health disparities
  • Community cancer prevention and control

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS:

  • Culturally Tailored Smoking Cessation for American Indians: This study is the first controlled trial to examine the efficacy of a culturally-tailored smoking cessation program for AI/ANs, All Nations Breath of Life (ANBL).
  • Nonsmokers and Tobacco Control Norms: Population Surveys and Intervention Studies: This study uses population surveys and intervention studies to test the idea that nonsmokers hold the key to increasing population cessation.
  • Promoting Smoking Cessation among Non-Daily Smokers: This study uses focus groups and surveys to understand young adults’ views of smoking cessation, the impact of novel tobacco products, and receptivity to various smoking cessation strategies.
  • Evaluating a Sequential Adaptive Smoking Cessation Intervention: This study evaluates an adaptive intervention utilizing FDA approved therapies and ENDS on smoking behaviors.
  • A feasibility study comparing e-cigarettes and traditional NRT effects on combustible cigarette behaviors among women with cervical dysplasia.
  • A follow-up study of e-cigarette users calling the Oklahoma Tobacco HeIpline.
  • Analysis of 2013 Oklahoma BRFSS data which included 5 state-added questions related to e-cigarette use.
  • Evaluation of TSET-Funded Programs:  The Oklahoma Tobacco research Center serves as the external evaluator for tobacco control programs funded by the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust.  These include comprehensive community-based programs, the Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline, specific population grants, and counter-marketing campaigns.
  • Director, Evaluation Key Components Activities, Oklahoma Shared Clinical and Translational Resources (OSCTR): The overall OSCTR mission is to serve as a catalyst for clinical research which improves health for underserved and underrepresented populations living in rural areas, to improve patient outcomes of these individuals, and to provide these resources to launch new independent IDeA investigator careers.