Jessica Reese, Ph.D

Reese Photo


Assistant Professor of Research
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology

Phone: (405) 271-2229, ext 46733
Office: The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
801 Northeast 13th Street, Room 112D
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104
Email:

Jessica-Reese@ouhsc.edu

Education and Training:

  • Ph.D. in Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
  • M.S. in Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
  • B.S. in Zoology and Biomedical Sciences, University of Oklahoma

Appointments and Positions:

  • August 2019 – Present  Assistant Professor of Research in Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Most Recent 5 Publications:

  • Mitta A, Curtis BR, Reese JA, George JN. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia: 2019 Update of clinical and laboratory data. Am J Hematol 2019; 94:E76-8.
  • Reese JA, Peck JD, Yu Z, Scordino TA, Deschamps DR, McIntosh JJ, Terrell DR, Vesely SK, George JN. Platelet sequestration and consumption in the placental intervillous space contribute to lower platelet counts during pregnancy. Am J Hematol 2019; 94:E8-11.
  • Saleem R, Reese JA, George JN. Drug-induced thrombotic microangiopathy: an updated systematic review, 2014-2018. Am J Hematol 2018; 93:E241-3.
  • Reese JA, Peck JD, Deschamps DR, McIntosh JJ, Knudtson EJ, Vesely SK, George JN. Platelet Counts during Pregnancy. N Engl J Med 2018; 379:32-43.
  • Reese JA, Peck JD, McIntosh JJ, Vesely SK, George, JN. Platelet counts in women with normal pregnancies: A systematic review. Am J Hematol 2017; 92: 1224-1232.

Research Interests:

  • Child and maternal health
  • Pregnancy outcomes
  • Platelet disorders: Gestational thrombocytopenia (GT), Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura-Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (TTP-HUS)
  • Epidemiology and prevention of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes

Current Major Research Projects:

  • Co-investigator, Cardiovascular Disease in American Indians (the Strong Heart Study) –funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)